India’s medical travel sector versus the government



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IMTJ

13 October

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Sink or swim: How the food and drink sector is adapting and innovating to overcome the challenges of Covid-19

There’s no denying that 2020 has been an unusual year, and one that has presented an entirely unique set of challenges to people in almost all walks of life and society – whether that be adapting to working from home or doing food shopping solely online, to socially distanced socialising and mask wearing while out and about.

It’s safe to say that it’s been an ‘unprecedented’ experience – and no doubt that’s one word we’ve heard to describe it more times already this year than we’d like. From travel to hospitality, banking to fitness, almost every industry and sector has had to adapt quickly to the ever-changing Covid landscape in order to survive, transforming the way we live and work in almost every conceivable way.

Despite the impact on almost all UK businesses, one industry that has had to adapt more quickly than many to the ‘new normal’ and transform

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30-second coronavirus test could help out the travel sector and more (NYSE:ABT)

A rapid coronavirus detection test that gives results in under a minute – developed by Israel and India – should be ready in “a matter of days,” according to Israeli Ambassador to India Ron Malka. “All the thresholds have been passed.”

“It will be good news for the entire world. Until we manage to immunize the entire population, this joint operation, which we had named ‘Open Skies,’ would literally open the skies in terms of international travel and other economic activities as this can be used at airports and other places by requiring a person just to blow into a tube and the result would be available in 30-40-50 seconds.”

The test is also very inexpensive, as the results are delivered locally without the logistics and cost of sending samples to a lab.

Israel sent a high-level Defense Research and Development Directorate delegation to India in July to develop the

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Investment in travel magazine is ‘vote of confidence’ in sector

An investment that will enable the relaunch of an independent magazine hit by Covid-19 has been labelled a “vote of confidence” in the travel media sector.

Ardent Media Ltd, which owned the quarterly Family Traveller magazine, was put into voluntary liquidation in September after the travel industry was paralysed by the Covid-19 pandemic.

But chief executive and founder Andrew Dent is part of a new team of investors that has bought the Family Traveller brand’s assets and is set to relaunch the magazine with a December/January issue focusing on Easter and summer holidays for 2021.

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Dent said: “It is a massive recognition to the work we have done over the years that despite incredibly tough trading conditions we have attracted investment to continue our work building the world’s largest community of family travellers.

“In the months leading up to the Covid crisis we were operating a profitable and

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No recovery in sight for Asia-Pacific’s commercial property sector as Covid-19 travel restrictions slam deals, retail sales

Property investors are staying on the sidelines in Asia-Pacific, with a strong recovery unlikely to happen anytime soon, analysts said.

The Covid-19 pandemic and the resulting economic shock has slammed the region’s commercial real estate market. The total value of transactions plummeted by nearly 40 per cent in the year to September, as the number of deals fell by almost a third, according to Real Capital Analytics.

“Everybody is being cautious,” said Desmond Sim, head of research for Singapore and Southeast Asia at CBRE. “We have to say that no one is fully back to normal from Covid-19, as GDP was impacted and the way we work has changed. Certain markets in Asia have been affected gravely, including hospitality, retail and office.”

Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China.

Asia-Pacific commercial real estate investment volume fell 48 per cent

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Cruise ship dismantling booms after pandemic scuttles sector

Business is booming at a sea dock in western Turkey, where five hulking cruise ships are being dismantled for scrap metal sales after the Covid-19 pandemic all but destroyed the industry, the head of a ship recyclers’ group said on Friday.

Cruise ships were home to the some of the earliest clusters of Covid-19 as the pandemic spread globally early this year.

In March, US authorities issued a no-sail order for all cruise ships that remains in place.

On Friday, dozens of workers stripped walls, windows, floors and railings from several vessels in the dock in Aliaga, a town 45km north of Izmir on Turkey’s west coast. Three more ships are set to join those already being dismantled.

Five luxury cruise ships are seen being broken down for scrap metal at the Aliaga ship recycling port on October 02, 2020 in Izmir, Turkey. Photograph: Chris McGrath/Getty
Five luxury cruise ships are seen being broken down for scrap metal at the Aliaga ship recycling port on October 02, 2020 in Izmir, Turkey. Photograph: Chris McGrath/Getty
Luxury cruise ships are seen being broken down for scrap metal. Photograph: Chris McGrath/Getty
Luxury cruise ships are
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Bali’s unemployed turn to odd jobs, hard labour as COVID-19 ravages tourism sector

DENPASAR, Indonesia: It was barely 7pm and Kuta, Bali’s most famous and vibrant tourism hotspot, appeared desolate and grim. 

Gone were the thumping sound of dance music blaring from its nightclubs, the calls of shopkeepers offering cheap clothes and souvenirs as well as the cheerful laughter of tourists from across the world strolling down its pavements in search of a good time.

The COVID-19 pandemic and the worldwide travel restrictions which followed have stopped the tourists from coming.

As a result, nearly all shops and restaurants lining the streets of Kuta had to shut down their businesses temporarily.  

Kuta – an area which before the pandemic was crammed by thousands of travellers and where complete traffic gridlock could be observed at 2am on a weekday – is now completely lifeless.

A general view of Kuta beach amid the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bali

A general view of Kuta beach amid the spread of COVID-19 in Bali, Indonesia, Mar 23, 2020. (Photo:

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Cruise ship dismantling booms in Turkey after pandemic scuttles sector

ALIAGA, Turkey (Reuters) – Business is booming at a sea dock in western Turkey, where five hulking cruise ships are being dismantled for scrap metal sales after the COVID-19 pandemic all but destroyed the industry, the head of a ship recyclers’ group said on Friday.

Cruise ships were home to the some of the earliest clusters of COVID-19 as the pandemic spread globally early this year.

In March, U.S. authorities issued a no-sail order for all cruise ships that remains in place.

On Friday, dozens of workers stripped walls, windows, floors and railings from several vessels in the dock in Aliaga, a town 45 km north of Izmir on Turkey’s west coast. Three more ships are set to join those already being dismantled.

Before the pandemic, Turkey’s ship-breaking yards typically handled cargo and container ships, Kamil Onal, chairman of a ship recycling industrialists’ association, told Reuters.

“But after the pandemic,

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Cruise Ship Dismantling Booms in Turkey After Pandemic Scuttles Sector | Investing News

ALIAGA, Turkey (Reuters) – Business is booming at a sea dock in western Turkey, where five hulking cruise ships are being dismantled for scrap metal sales after the COVID-19 pandemic all but destroyed the industry, the head of a ship recyclers’ group said on Friday.

Cruise ships were home to the some of the earliest clusters of COVID-19 as the pandemic spread globally early this year.

In March, U.S. authorities issued a no-sail order for all cruise ships that remains in place.

On Friday, dozens of workers stripped walls, windows, floors and railings from several vessels in the dock in Aliaga, a town 45 km north of Izmir on Turkey’s west coast. Three more ships are set to join those already being dismantled.

Before the pandemic, Turkey’s ship-breaking yards typically handled cargo and container ships, Kamil Onal, chairman of a ship recycling industrialists’ association, told Reuters.

“But after the pandemic,

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