Carnival cancels November sailings from Port Canaveral, Miami

Dave Berman
 
| Florida Today

Carnival Cruise Line on Monday canceled its November sailings from Port Canaveral, saying they “will not be feasible,” even if a federal no-sail order is lifted by then.

Cruising has been shut down at Port Canaveral and other U.S. ports since mid-March because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Carnival was hoping to resume sailings from Port Canaveral and PortMiami in November, assuming the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention does not extend its no-sail order beyond its current Oct. 31 end date.

But Carnival on Monday announced it will wait until at least December to start sailing again.

More: Federal ‘no-sail order’ for cruise ships extended again, now until Oct. 31

More: Port Canaveral commissioners OKs budget that includes reduced payments to Sheriff’s Office

“Carnival continues to work on protocols and procedures that would allow for the resumption of cruise operations, with a gradual, phased-in approach,

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Carnival Cruise Line Cancels Miami And Port Canaveral Cruises For November 2020

MIAMI, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Carnival Cruise Line has notified guests and travel agents that it is cancelling the remaining cruises for the six total ships operating from PortMiami and Port Canaveral for November 2020. 

It has also cancelled five cruises scheduled to operate from Sydney, Australia from Jan. 16 – Feb. 8, 2021.

Following the U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) decision to extend its no-sail order for cruise operations until Oct. 31, Carnival cancelled all but PortMiami and Port Canaveral cruises for the rest of the year.  It has now determined that November 2020 operations will not be feasible.

Carnival continues to work on protocols and procedures that would allow for the resumption of cruise operations, with a gradual, phased-in approach, designating Miami and Port Canaveral as the first two homeports for embarkations.  Cruises currently scheduled for December from those two homeports remain in

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Top four best river cruise lines for port excursions

Whether you’re cruising the Danube, the Rhone or the Mekong rivers, port excursions can make or break your trip. We’ve rounded up a selection of the best river cruise lines for port excursions, based on our river cruises survey.

Taking a full or half day at a time, it’s vital you choose an itinerary full of stop-offs that suit you. Port excursions may only be a whistle-stop tour of a city or only take in a historic building, so if there’s a particular place you have your heart set on visiting that’s not included you may be better off going it alone.

The table below contains the highest-scoring brands, rated by cruise fans for offering all-inclusive ease or a variety of options at each port.

The lines cover most budget levels, so you should find something to suit you. Do you want to know how to choose the best river

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PHOTOS: Cruise ships broken up in Turkish port show COVID-19 impact

  • Photos show rows of deluxe cruise ships waiting to be dismantled in a sea dock in Turkey as the coronavirus pandemic continues to sink the industry. 
  • Around 2,5000 scrapyard workers are currently working to pull apart five cruise ships for scrap metal sales.
  • Among them was the Carnival Fantasy, a newly-refurbished cruise ship that was recently sold by Carnival Cruise Line.
  • “We are trying to change the crisis into an opportunity,” Kamil Onal, chairman of a ship recycling industrialists’ association told Reuters.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

British, American, and Italian cruise ships are being dismantled in a sea dock in Turkey as the coronavirus pandemic continues to sink the industry. 

Five hulking cruise ships are currently being pulled apart for scrap metal in the port of Aliaga, a town 30 miles north of the Turkish city Izmir.

Among them was the Carnival Fantasy, a newly-refurbished cruise ship

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CDC extends cruise ban, but Port Canaveral still ready for November

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention extended a no-sail order for cruise lines from U.S. ports through Oct. 31, the cruise industry was already in a holding pattern until at least November. Despite the potential for a further extension in another month, Port Canaveral and at least one cruise line are prepping for the return of sailing.

Cruise lines have been under the order since mid-March as part of the CDC’s efforts to battle the spread of coronavirus, but have also voluntarily suspended sailings. All member lines to trade group Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) had earlier this summer already halted plans to get back to business until at least Nov. 1.

So now with the CDC update, the dates match, but it could have been longer.

Ahead of Wednesday night’s extension, media outlets including Axios and The New York Times reported the head of the CDC wanted

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Cruise lines plan to ban passengers from freely roaming port cities

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Forget the tequila shots, straw markets and jewelry stores.

If cruise lines are allowed to resume operations anytime soon, passengers won’t be permitted to roam freely around port cities.

Proposals to limit the spread of COVID-19 call for allowing passengers to disembark only if they are signed up for an excursion sponsored by the cruise line, one of a series of health protocols developed by an industry eager to resume operations after a six-month COVID-19 shutdown.

Will passengers be eager to board ships that they won’t be allowed to leave unless they pay for an excursion?

“I wouldn’t like that at all. That would stop me from cruising,” said Scott Braun, a Miami resident and avid cruiser. He and his wife, Judith, say they’ve been on more than 30 cruises all over the world and find that roaming cities and meeting locals are the best parts

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Can Cruises Sail Safely? Port Canaveral Looks at Protocols

PORT CANAVERAL, Fla. — As the country is slowly opening back, there’s one industry that’s still waiting for the green light. Some European cruise ships have already resumed activities since August and they could be the example for local ports to begin operating once again.


What You Need To Know

  • CDC no sail order set to expire at the end of the month
  • CDC asked for public comment regarding whether cruise ships should sail again
  • Cruise industry looking at several protocols
  • RELATED: A Return to Cruising on the Florida Horizon?

During Port Canaveral’s commission meeting Wednesday, Port Canaveral CEO Capt. John Murray says Europe is leading by example — reduce capacity, COVID-19 testing, temperature checks, mask requirements, something local cruise ships are equipped to do.

“The no-sail order is set to expire, any concern it will be extended? Yes because up until this point the CDC hasn’t provided much guidance

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Cruise lines should ban passengers from freely roaming port cities, cruise panel proposes

Don’t expect to cruise and roam anytime soon.

As cruise lines prepare to return to the waters, the industry is considering a variety of safety measures and adjustments to keep guests safe during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. But these changes won’t just affect how passengers behave on the boat – they might also affect what they’re allowed to do off the boat.

One of the proposals sent to the CDC would reportedly limit passengers from freely roaming around towns connected to ports that ships dock at.

One of the proposals sent to the CDC would reportedly limit passengers from freely roaming around towns connected to ports that ships dock at.
(iStock)

A number of proposals have been provided to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in hopes of convincing the agency to refrain from extending the current no-sail order, the Sun-Sentinel reported. The order, which had already been extended earlier this year, currently expires on Sept. 30, although major cruise lines have pledged not to return to the waters until after Oct. 31,

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Proposal cuts Brevard County Sheriff’s Office’s cost to port by $1M

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Port Canaveral Chief Executive Officer John Murray will present the new contract proposal for seaport security and law enforcement services to Canaveral Port Authority commissioners on Wednesday. (Photo: Dave Berman/FLORIDA TODAY)

Port Canaveral will be paying the Brevard County Sheriff’s Office about $1 million less for seaport security and law enforcement services in the budget year that begins Oct. 1, under a plan port commissioners will vote on Wednesday.

Port commissioners last month indicated that they wanted a reduction in the cost because of the reduced need for BCSO services, stemming from the halt since March of multiday cruise operations. The halt of cruising was a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the proposed contract for seaport security and law enforcement services, Port Canaveral will pay the BCSO $6.01 million in the 2020-21 budget year, down from $6.76 million in the current 2019-20 budget year that ends

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