Austria ski resort virus outbreak mishandled, report finds

Local and federal authorities could have contained the spread of a coronavirus outbreak that infected thousands of tourists in two Austrian ski resorts, according to a report published Monday.

“From March 8, a correct assessment should have led to the closing of bars, the stopping of ski lifts and orderly management of departures,” of tourists from Ischgl, a village in the western state of Tyrol, the experts found in a report seen by AFP. 

Instead, after a barkeeper in Ischgl tested positive for Covid-19 on March 7, tourists were not informed. Skiing and partying continued for several days until a complete and immediate lockdown of Ischgl and Sankt Anton, a nearby ski resort, were announced on March 13.

Tourists were forced to evacuate within hours, and in the end more than 6,000 people from 45 countries, including Britain, the US and Germany, said they contracted Covid-19 on their holidays.

“There

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Largest Alaska ski resort to operate with changes for virus

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s biggest ski resort is set to operate this season with a new operations plan that includes health precautions like mandatory face coverings.

Alyeska Resort in Girdwood cut the last ski season short because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Alaska Public Media reported Friday.

“No mask, no service here at Alyeska Resort,” Marketing Director Ben Napolitano said. “That includes all public spaces, that includes lift lines, and that includes being inside the aerial tramway as well.”

Skiers will be allowed to temporarily remove masks only while moving down the slopes, Napolitano said.

Skiers will no longer be allowed to get close to strangers on chairlifts or while using the resort’s tram system. Lines to board the lifts and tram will be configured to encourage social distancing.

“Inside the tram we’ll have a reduced capacity per tram car, as well as sanitizing between rides,” Napolitano said. “And

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Botched Austrian Ski Resort Shutdown Spread Virus and Sowed Panic, Judge Says

(Bloomberg) —

Austrian authorities should have shut down the ski resort of Ischgl at least four days earlier than they did because the risks it would spread Covid-19 were evident, said a panel of experts appointed by Tyrol province.

Ischgl, known as “Ibiza of the Alps” for its apres-ski culture, should have been closed by local authorities on March 9 after infections of guests and bar staff became known, according to Ronald Rohrer, a retired judge from Austria’s highest court, who headed the panel. Then, the mishandling of the resort’s evacuation caused chaos which may have accelerated the spread of the virus, he said on Monday as he presented the 287-page report in Tyrol’s capital, Innsbruck.



a man with a mountain in the background: Ischgl GETTY sub


© Photographer: Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Ischgl GETTY sub

Summer tourists take the Flimjochbahn ski lift up to Flimjoch peak in Ischgl, Austria on Sept. 9.

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Photographer: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The actual start

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Documents Suggest Virus Was Downplayed At Austria Resort

Official communications and minutes of meetings seen by AFP suggest authorities in the Austrian state of Tyrol downplayed a notorious coronavirus outbreak in one of its ski resorts in March.

Ischgl, known for its lively apres-ski scene, was at the centre of an outbreak of the coronavirus in Tyrol in which more than 6,000 tourists from 45 countries say they became infected.

State officials have repeatedly said that no mistakes were made in handling the outbreak in Ischgl, one of Austria’s most lucrative and prestigious ski resorts, and that authorities acted correctly according to the information they had at the time.

The public prosecutor’s department in Tyrol is investigating the events at the resort and has declined to comment publicly on the probe.

The resort of Ischgl was locked down on March 13 The resort of Ischgl was locked down on March 13 Photo: APA / JAKOB GRUBER

However, AFP has seen documents regarding the outbreak which run to thousands

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Concern over rise in virus cases in US Northeast

HARTFORD, Conn. — Dr. Deborah Birx of the White House coronavirus task force says she is concerned about the uptick in coronavirus cases in the Northeast.

She said Thursday at the University of Connecticut’s Hartford campus that a “very different” kind of spread is happening now.

She says it’s not happening in the workplace so much because people are taking precautions. She says more people are becoming infected because of indoor family gatherings and social events as the weather cools.

She says that was a lesson learned in the South during the summer when people went indoors for air conditioning.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Washington DC health department asks Rose Garden attendees to get tested

— Paris hospitals on emergency footing as ICUs fill with coronavirus patients

— Am I immune to the coronavirus if I’ve already had it?

— President Trump

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NY to resume restrictions in virus hot spots

ALBANY, N.Y. — New York’s governor says the state will reinstate restrictions on businesses, houses of worship and schools in and around areas where coronavirus cases are spiking.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday that the severity of shutdowns would vary by proximity to hot spots.

The rules will take effect no later than Friday in parts of New York City’s Brooklyn and Queens boroughs, sections of Orange and Rockland counties north of the city, and an area within the upstate city of Binghamton near the Pennsylvania border.

The planned restrictions include shutdowns of schools and nonessential businesses in some areas. Others would set limits on gatherings and in restaurants.


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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Pentagon says top military leaders are under self-quarantine

— How do I politely ask someone to wear a mask? If in store or restaurant, have a manager make the

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Bali could be last place Aussies return to amid exploding virus deaths

The coronavirus death rate is exploding in Bali, sparking fears it’ll be among the last places to welcome Aussie visitors again.

Business is suffering so severely even major chains are permanently closing, including McDonald’s in the centre of usual-hotspot Kuta.

READ MORE: Travel to Bali ruled out until at least 2021



a group of people on a beach: The coronavirus death rate is exploding in Bali, sparking fears it'll be among the last places to welcome Aussie visitors again.


© 9News
The coronavirus death rate is exploding in Bali, sparking fears it’ll be among the last places to welcome Aussie visitors again.

Deserted beaches resemble those of the 1980s before the island’s tourism boom and Kuta’s party strip has an undeniably eerie vibe with dance floors and bar tables empty and rarely a reveller in sight.

During the September school holidays Waterbom Bali’s water slides would normally host 1200 thrill seekers. Instead it’s temporarily closed.

“Tourists gave people a life and it’s so sad,” CEO Sayan Gulino said.



a row of beach chairs and an umbrella: Deserted beaches resemble those of the 1980s before the island's tourism boom.


© 9News
Deserted beaches resemble those of the 1980s before

Read More

Bali could be last place Aussies return to amid exploding virus death rate

The coronavirus death rate is exploding in Bali, sparking fears it’ll be among the last places to welcome Aussie visitors again.

Business is suffering so severely even major chains are permanently closing, including McDonald’s in the centre of usual-hotspot Kuta.

READ MORE: Travel to Bali ruled out until at least 2021



a group of people on a beach: The coronavirus death rate is exploding in Bali, sparking fears it'll be among the last places to welcome Aussie visitors again.


© 9News
The coronavirus death rate is exploding in Bali, sparking fears it’ll be among the last places to welcome Aussie visitors again.

Deserted beaches resemble those of the 1980s before the island’s tourism boom and Kuta’s party strip has an undeniably eerie vibe with dance floors and bar tables empty and rarely a reveller in sight.

During the September school holidays Waterbom Bali’s water slides would normally host 1200 thrill seekers. Instead it’s temporarily closed.

“Tourists gave people a life and it’s so sad,” CEO Sayan Gulino said.



a row of beach chairs and an umbrella: Deserted beaches resemble those of the 1980s before the island's tourism boom.


© 9News
Deserted beaches resemble those of the 1980s before

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Airlines and cruise stocks tumble as Trump’s positive virus test dents the reopening trade

  • Stocks that are closely tied to the reopening of the American economy were crushed in Friday trades after President Trump tested positive for COVID-19.
  • The news served as a reminder to investors just how precarious the economic reopening is as Winter approaches and daily COVID-19 cases are on the rise.
  • Airlines and cruise stocks led the decline lower on Friday.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The reopening trade, or buying stocks that are closely tied to the reopening of the American economy, was crushed on Friday after it was revealed that President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have tested positive for COVID-19.

The news served as a stark reminder to investors that anyone can get the virus, the reopening of the economy is precarious without a readily available vaccine, and daily COVID-19 cases are on the rise as winter approaches.

Stocks

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German Cases Jump; Israel Sees Record Infections: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — Global coronavirus cases approached 34 million, with Germany reporting the highest number of infections since April. Israel saw a record 8,919 new cases after a dip over the holiday weekend.

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Spain ordered additional restrictions on movement and gatherings in Madrid, while the U.K. extended a ban on household mixing to Liverpool and several cities in the northeast of England.

U.S. carriers American Airlines Group Inc. and United Airlines Holdings Inc. will start laying off a combined 32,000 workers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention extended a ban on cruises in the U.S.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases top 33.9 million; deaths exceed 1 millionMore cities are at risk of a housing bubblePandemics overtake climate change as biggest worry for insurersRemote work is letting people take epic road trips during CovidRapid Covid tests could give America a bit of life back

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