Resuming campaign travel, Trump to return to Pennsylvania

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — President Donald Trump plans to travel to Johnstown on Tuesday, his first visit to Pennsylvania following his positive coronavirus test a few days after he was last in the battleground state.

The evening rally is at John Murtha Johnstown-Cambria County Airport, in a coal and steel county that, once a supporter of Democrats, delivered a 37 percentage-point victory for Trump in the 2016 election.

The county also delivered strong results for Republicans in the 2018 election and, in recent weeks, Republicans overtook Democrats for the edge in the county’s voter registration.

Trump’s visit follows a visit there by Democratic nominee Joe Biden, who also visited Erie on Saturday.

Since 2016, Democratic registration has shrunk in Cambria County by more than 7,000, while Republican registration has risen by more than 6,000.

Trump was resuming campaign travel Monday after he was hospitalized and then quarantined at the White

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Trump plans aggressive travel schedule to reset campaign hit by series of setbacks

President Donald Trump is running out of time to recover from a series of self-inflicted setbacks that have rattled his base of support and triggered alarm among Republicans who fear the White House is on the verge of being lost to Democrat Joe Biden.

The one-two punch of Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis and his widely panned debate performance also has Republicans worried they could lose control of the Senate. With just over three weeks until Election Day, Senate races in some reliably red states, including South Carolina and Kansas, are competitive, aided by a surge in Democratic fundraising that has put both the Republican Party and Trump’s own campaign at an unexpected financial disadvantage.

The president will aim for a reset this week, hoping an aggressive travel schedule and Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation hearings will energize his most loyal supporters and shift attention away from a virus that

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North Carolina key to Trump and Biden in 2020 election

President Donald Trump campaign rally at the Fayetteville Regional Airport in Fayetteville, N.C., on Sept. 19. Trump has visited the Tar Heel state regularly this campaign season.

President Donald Trump campaign rally at the Fayetteville Regional Airport in Fayetteville, N.C., on Sept. 19. Trump has visited the Tar Heel state regularly this campaign season.
Andrew Craft, The Fayetteville Observer

President Donald Trump’s frequent visits to North Carolina are a sign: the state and its 15 Electoral College votes are critical to his effort to win reelection.

He has made seven appearances here since July 27 — four in September alone. Two stops were on Aug. 21: He visited Charlotte for the COVID-subdued GOP convention and observed a food assistance program in the western mountains. When he held his signature rallies, thousands of energetic supporters waited hours to see him.

Democratic nominee Joe Biden has held back on public appearances due to the coronavirus, instead primarily conducting online gatherings with surrogates to boost support. He had a low-key visit to Charlotte in September, and vice presidential nominee Kamala

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Trump turned his hotels, resorts into ‘Beltway’s new back rooms’: New York Times

The New York Times has released a report, the fourth in its series, based on President Donald Trump’s federal tax returns, illustrating how the paper says the president turned “his own hotels and resorts into the Beltway’s new back rooms, where public and private business mix and special interests reign.”



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump walks to the White House residence after exiting Marine One on the South Lawn on June 25, 2020, in Washington.


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images, FILE
President Donald Trump walks to the White House residence after exiting Marine One on the South Lawn on June 25, 2020, in Washington.

Trump attended 34 political fundraisers at his hotels and resorts that brought in $3 million in revenue, the Times reported.

“Sometimes he lined up his donors to ask what they needed from the government,” the Times said.

Brian Ballard, a Florida lobbyist and confidant of the president, joined Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida midway through Trump’s presidency, the paper reported. Associates later said he did this because the president wanted him to

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Trump turned his hotels, resorts into ‘Beltway’s new back rooms,’ New York Times reports

Trump attended 34 political fundraisers at his hotels and resorts that brought in $3 million in revenue, the Times reported.

“Sometimes he lined up his donors to ask what they needed from the government,” the Times said.

Brian Ballard, a Florida lobbyist and confidant of the president, joined Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida midway through Trump’s presidency, the paper reported. Associates later said he did this because the president wanted him to “ante up,” the Times said.

Ballard dismissed any accusations questioning his membership at Mar-a-Lago, the Times reported, and called the idea, in part, “ridiculous.”

PHOTO: President Donald Trump walks to the White House residence after exiting Marine One on the South Lawn on June 25, 2020, in Washington.

President Donald Trump walks

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Pelosi and Trump Are at Odds Over Airline Relief

Here’s what you need to know:

Credit…Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California on Thursday said she would not agree to stand-alone aid package for airlines unless the Trump administration committed to a broader pandemic relief plan to help struggling Americans, declaring that “there is no stand-alone bill without a bigger bill.”

Her comments cast doubt on the prospects for a compromise just hours after President Trump had given an upbeat assessment, saying in an interview that he had reconsidered his decision to pull the plug on bipartisan negotiations on a stimulus plan until after the election.

“I shut down talks two days ago because they weren’t working out,” Mr. Trump said during a wide-ranging interview on Fox Business. “Now they’re starting to

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Find out where Trump and Biden stand on defense and security issues

Arms Control:

U.S. President Donald Trump: The Trump administration has withdrawn the U.S. from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, and (almost) the 1992 Open Skies Treaty. It has loosened the Missile Technology Control Regime’s restrictions on selling armed drones to foreign governments amid concerns about China’s defense relationships in the Middle East. As of press time, administration officials have been unwilling to extend the 2010 New START nuclear pact with Russia, which expires in February, insisting that a new version include Russia’s growing arsenal of tactical nuclear weapons and China, whose smaller arsenal is rapidly expanding and which appears unwilling to sign such an agreement.

Former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden: Favored by arms control advocates, Biden has promised to renew New START and would likely accept Russia’s offer to extend it five years without preconditions. He also said he would rejoin the

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Trump Pushes for $1,200 Checks, PPP, and Airline Aid After Ending Stimulus Talks

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(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)


Getty Images

After President
Donald Trump
ended stimulus talks until after the Nov. 3 election, a sudden and unexpected move that sent U.S. stocks sharply lower Tuesday, Trump tweeted that he would sign a stand-alone bill for $1,200 stimulus checks to Americans and additional funding for airlines and small businesses.

Progress in negotiations between the Trump administration and House Democrats since Speaker
Nancy Pelosi
unveiled a slimmed-down package worth about $2.4 trillion last week had lifted the market in recent sessions.

Before the president instructed his team to call it quits, Trump held a call with Treasury Secretary
Steven Mnuchin
, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The GOP leaders were reportedly skeptical that they could get their members to support the deal that Mnuchin, the administration’s chief negotiator, was working to craft.

After the president’s tweet to

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Trump can’t resume holding migrant kids in hotels, court says

Nomaan Merchant, The Associated Press
Published 7:37 a.m. ET Oct. 5, 2020 | Updated 1:47 p.m. ET Oct. 5, 2020

CLOSE

Many U.S. airlines are overstaffed due to reduced flying schedules and low demand for air travel amid the coronavirus pandemic.

USA TODAY

HOUSTON – An appeals court refused Sunday to allow the Trump administration to resume detaining immigrant children in hotel rooms before expelling them under rules adopted during the coronavirus pandemic.

Three judges on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals left in place a lower court’s order that requires the U.S. government to stop using hotels in most situations to detain children unaccompanied by a parent. The judges denied the government’s request for a stay of that order.

Since March, border agents have placed at least 577 unaccompanied children in hotel rooms before expelling them from the country without a chance to request asylum or other immigration

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Trump administration must stop holding immigrant children in hotels for weeks, Ninth Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has ruled the Trump administration must end its practice of holding immigrant children in hotels for days or weeks after stopping them at the border, and instead must house them in licensed facilities while awaiting possible deportation.

A court-approved 1997 settlement in the Flores case, still in effect, requires the government to release undocumented immigrants under 18 to their parents, if available, and if not, to house them in a licensed, minimum-security facility within three to five days.

But after barring all immigration from Mexico in March at the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak, the administration’s Department of Homeland Security started placing newly apprehended minors in hotels. As of Aug. 20, a judge found, 660 youths aged 10 to 17 had been held in 25 hotels, most for five days or less, but about one-fourth for more than 10 days and some for as long as

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